WWYD?Embracing TORAH!

What Would Yahushua Do?

YaHuWaH or Yehovah? A modern man verdict...

Recently, proponents for Yehovah as the "most accurate" version of the Father's Name have made much ground within the Hebrew Roots movement, the most prolific among them being the Methodist preacher Keith Johnson, and Nehemia Gordon, a Karaite Jew, as Keith's co-author and speaking partner. There are others, like the discredited Michael Rood, but Keith and Nehemia are most in the public eye recently, and I would argue, two of the most evangelistic in promoting their version of the Father's Name, Yehovah.

This saddened me, the infiltration of the version Yehovah within the Hebrew Roots movement, so I decided I needed to offer a logical, modern man defense for the version I believe to be the most accurate version of the Tetragrammaton, YaHuWaH. Although I believe Nehemia Gordon to be a good, just man who loves Torah and Torah alone, I do also believe that his Masoretic-based, vowel-points influence on the Father's Name, and the name of His Son, are corrupting/leavening the movement away from the logical, more accurate name of The Father to an inaccurate form based on Jewish language traditions and crafty Masorete deception (hiding The Name).

The Masoretes and The Masoretic Text

Before we can discover the correct pronunciation of The Father's Name, we must understand who the Masorete Jewish scribes were, as it is their text, the Masoretic Text, which is the universally accepted Hebrew text of the TaNaKH and chief text that gives us most modern Bibles.

Masoretes, as their name defines, were known as tradition-keepers and traditionalists. Wikipedia defines them as:

The Masoretes (ba'alei hamasorah, Hebrew בעלי המסורה) were groups of mostly Karaite scribes and scholars working between the 7th and 11th centuries, based primarily in present-day Israel in the cities of Tiberias and Jerusalem, as well as in Iraq (Babylonia). Each group compiled a system of pronunciation and grammatical guides in the form of diacritical notes on the external form of the Biblical text in an attempt to fix the pronunciation, paragraph and verse divisions and cantillation of the Jewish Bible, the Tanakh, for the worldwide Jewish community.

The Masoretes devised the vowel notation system for Hebrew that is still widely used, as well as the trope symbols used for cantillation.

The Masoretes are believed to be Karaite (debate continues), so it is no surprise that Nehemia Gordon, a Karaite Jew, would be greatly influenced by their Hebrew texts, even to a subconscious, reflex level. It was the Masoretes who took the OLDER Hebrew texts and added vowel points and pronunciation markings (Masorah), giving us what is today called the "Masoretic Text." Yet we must also recognize the TRADITIONS that were ingrained in their very beings, shading the way they read, wrote, and coded the ancient Hebrew texts they were working on, as well as their understanding of who would read these texts they were coding, and even more so, how they could HIDE what to them was "too sacred" for anyone less the Priesthood to correctly read and dare utter in pronunciation: The Tetragrammaton, The Father's Name.

Hiding HaShem (Hiding The Name)

Around 1400 years before the Masoretic Text, going all the way back to the Babylonian captivity, Jewish law (rabbinical law) became very strict in the belief that HaShem (The Name) was far too sacred to utter in voice except by the Priesthood, and even then only in secret study and during certain moadim (Holy Days). The Mishnah, Judaism's first sacred book, shows us this in Sanhedrin 10:1, and the Talmud further expounds on 10:1 in 28b, that many rabbi's taught that speaking The Name would forfeit any right to the world to come and one should be put to death for doing so. Although some were not so strong on it, the TRADITION began and is now held as defacto doctrine.

With this long history of tradition "protecting The Name," misguided and in error as it may be, we must believe that the Masoretes, who were ultra-traditionalists, would most assuredly attempt to HIDE the true vowel points of the Tetragrammaton from "the unclean, ignorant goy (nations)" that would now more fully understand Hebrew due to their work, to be especially kept hidden from those people who began to call themselves, "Christians." Nehemia Gordon also believes this "hiding" to be possible, but for other reasons, that being to guard from "accidental" pronunciation by Jews. Either way, I believe the Masoretes willingly and knowingly "added to Scripture" their man-made laws, even to the point of purposeful DECEPTION. With this arrogance, by placing rabbinical laws as superior to "what is written," we must question other vowel points of the Masoretes, ones often used as defense of the version Yehovah, as suspect as well. I think this will become quite obvious as we look into the Tetragrammaton as the Masoretes coded it, and indeed their traditions that also tainted and corrupted the spelling and pronunciation of the Messiah's name.

Add a dash of Adonai, then add some Elohim to season? Maybe...

So how did the Masoretes "cook the Books?" They took the pure Tetragrammaton, the four (4) Hebrew vowel letters, Yod-Hey-Waw-Hey, and in an attempt to PROTECT The Name from those too ignorant and unclean to know the TRUE pronunciation, overlaid MODIFIED vowel points of Adonai (Strong's #3068) and Elohim (Strong's #3069) over the Tetragrammaton, effectively HIDING in plain sight the correct pronunciation of The Father's Name. They did this, in my opinion, for DECEPTION, and crafty were they, they knew that they could not effectively hide it by just dropping known vowel points (Adonai/Elohim) on top of it, that would be too obvious, they had to be even more devious. Since we know that the Masoretes had no qualms about "adding to Scripture" to further their rabbinical laws, writing in margins, etc..., we must assume that this deception was the result of much thought and contemplation. These Masorete men were not shallow thinkers, they were scholars of their day, so we cannot expect simple deception, rather we must expect deception upon deception to support deception. Since scholars with far more education then I still debate vociferously this theory, I, as a modern, English-speaking man, ignorant and separated as I am from those who wrote it and spoke it, must eventually use the logic of the obvious guided by the Spirit of Elohim within us, teaching us... I call this "The Doctrine of the Obvious."

HalleluYAH for the obvious!

When deception and religious sect intrigue permeate many ancient texts, all Judeo-Christian doctrines, denominations and schools of thought; a seeker of what is TRUTH must eventually acknowledge the insurmountable, that much TRUTH will remain unknown until Messiah returns, and one must make assumptions... But these assumptions do not have to be in ignorance; rather it can be based on SOLID circumstantial evidence, and this is where I take my stand on this debate. I think the "most likely answer" is often the most obvious...

If anyone doubts the absolute mess pronounceable Hebrew and Greek have become, take a read through Nehemia Gordon's essay, "The Pronunciation of the Name." Although his purpose was to prove his version of The Name, Yehovah, he more effectively shows the futility of anyone, anywhere being able to say their pronunciation of anything Hebrew or Greek is 100% accurate to what was spoken by the original speakers in ancient times. Indeed, it all is assumptions and guesstamations, even among the Scholars...

HalleluYAH! The only preserved witness throughout all languages...

Every Semitic language scholar, if honest, must admit the miracle of the global preservation of the word, Halleluyah. In all tongues, the whole world knows how "Halleluyah" is pronounced! They may not know what it means, but they know how to say it. I submit this miracle as Evidence #1 to the doctrine of the obvious...

HalleluYAH means "Praise Yah"

Hallelu (הלל Strong's H1984), in this context, means to "praise," almost ecstatically,  and is a second-person imperative masculine plural form of the Hebrew verb hallal. From this we know that what may follow this word is the SUBJECT of the praise...

Yah (יה Strong's H3050) is a shortened form of YHWH, the name for the Creator. Almost every honest language scholar admits this, as well as the timeless, unchanged way it is pronounced throughout generations, in all languages, even today.

Nowhere, in any language, in any culture that I know of, is HalleluYAH pronounced "Hallelu-YEH." Scholars and proponents of the pronunciation Yehovah/Jehovah may offer all kinds of complex excuses to explain away THE OBVIOUS, but the OBVIOUS remains, the name of the Creator begins with YAH (YaHuWaH), not YEH (Yehovah).

More to come, stay tuned...